Nom de maiden de plume de who?

Ramping up my freelance writing career coincided with getting married, leaving all kinds of fun decision when it comes to my name. My plan was to keep Palm as a second middle name (who says one must be restricted to one?) as well as maintaining “Emily Palm” as my pen name. Then, when it comes to “normal” goings on, I’m “Emily Mulica” or “Emily Allison Palm Mulica,” if you’re not into the whole brevity thing.

Turns out my clean little plan isn’t so straightforward. For example, when requesting press passes, am I Emily Palm or Emily Mulica? Furthermore, when I introduce myself to sources I interview for articles, I’m sure it lends to my credibility when I begin bumbling, “You see, Palm is my maiden name, but now I’m using it …” blah, blah, blah.

Another wrench I’m monkeying with began when I wrote my ski column last year as “Emily Mulica,” before I developed my fail-proof name situation. Today I turn in my first ski column for this season, for the three people that might remember, will they wonder why “Steep Shots” was written by “Emily Mulica” last year and now it’s “Emily Palm”?

I have a hunch that people don’t think about me that often, so the segue will be a non-issue. However, it certainly begs the question, who the hell do I think I am?

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2 Comments

Filed under Musings

2 responses to “Nom de maiden de plume de who?

  1. Emily,
    I love this post. I, too, went through a bit of an identity crisis when I got married a few years back. And, like you, I’m a writer and names mean something. I also write about skiing, and one factor I didn’t consider when I decided to turn my maiden name into my middle name and use my husband’s last name, was that his last name means something in the ski industry. His family owns ski areas, and his father, Everett Kircher was a bit of an icon in the industry. Having said all that, I decided to publish my memoir under Kircher, rather than Huleen Kircher (my middle/maiden combo added in there), and I’m glad I did. But still. It’s hard to let go of my maiden name completely, and I’m still figuring out how to stay in contact with it.

  2. Hi Kim, Thanks so much for your comment. Yes, it’s certainly something many women face when getting married, and as a writer it seems to complicate things. I’ll have to check out your book, sounds very compelling. Also, I so admire ski patrollers. I wanted to be one, but get faint & queasy over the slightest injuries. —Emily

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